www.DiscoverTheNetwork.orgDate: 9/22/2014 3:12:19 AM

DONNA BRAZILE
Brazile

  • Democratic Party consultant and campaign manager
  • Fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government



Born in New Orleans on December 15, 1959, Donna Brazile earned a bachelor's degree in industrial psychology from Louisiana State University in 1981. She subsequently worked for a number of advocacy and lobbyist groups in Washington, DC, including the National Student Education Fund and the Community for Creative Non-Violence. Brazile first drew widespread public notice in 1981 as the national student coordinator for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Committee, which petitioned to make the late civil-rights leader's birthday a national holiday. In 1983 she helped Coretta Scott King organize a 20th anniversary commemoration of the historic 1963 March on Washington.

Brazile played a prominent role in the management of every
Democratic presidential campaign from 1976-2000. These included the White House bids of Jimmy Carter (1976 & 1980 volunteer); Jesse Jackson (1984 Southern field director and deputy campaign manager)[1]; Walter Mondale (1984 campaign worker); Richard Gephardt (1988 field director); Michael Dukakis (1988 field director); Bill Clinton (1992 senior advisor on black turnout, & 1996 Washington DC campaign director); and Al Gore (2000 campaign manager). Also during the '90s, Brazile served as a consultant to the Democratic National Committee (1990-99), and as press secretary/chief-of-staff to Washington, DC delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (1991-99).

Brazile's outspokenness has often made her a lightning rod for controversy. In 1988, for instance, the Dukakis campaign fired her for making unfounded accusations that George H.W. Bush’s presidential campaign discriminated against minorities, and for spreading unsubstantiated rumors that Bush was having an extramarital affair
. Less than three weeks before the election, Brazile urged Bush to “fess up” because “the American people have every right to know if Barbara Bush [his wife] will share that bed with him in the White House.”

During her tenure with Gore’s campaign, Brazile charged that Republicans had no real respect for African Americans; that instead of doing something to substantively help the black community, they were content to merely exploit a handful of select black conservatives whose token presence was designed to conceal the party's underlying bigotry: “The Republicans bring out Colin Powell and J.C. Watts because they have no program, no policy.... They’d rather take pictures with black children than feed them.”

After the 2000 presidential election controversy in Florida, Brazile was appointed chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee's Voting Rights Institute. She alleged that Republicans routinely sought to keep minorities away from the polls through the use of voter-suppression and intimidation tactics, a charge she has reiterated many times since then.

When the community organization ACORN was mired in a massive voter-registration-fraud scandal in 2008, Brazile downplayed it as “
no more than a few canvassers trying to meet their quota and make easy money by cheating the system.” By contrast, Brazile views Republican efforts to pass Voter ID laws as the schemes of “extremist governors or legislatures” who “are willing to violate people's civil rights in order to win elections.”

In a September 2011 appearance on
CNN, Brazile denounced conservative broadcaster Glenn Beck for having recently criticized Congressional Black Caucus member Andre Carson's vulgar derisions of the Tea Party movement. “[F]or Glenn Beck to somehow or another tell people of color or any Americans about racism, about blackness, about our founding fathers,” said Brazile, “I’m sorry, walk a day, walk a mile, but don’t tell me anything when Glenn Beck also insulted the president ... of the United States.” (The latter was a reference to Beck's 2009 claim that Barack Obama harbored “a deep-seated hatred for white people or the white culture.”)

A steadfast belief in the ubiquity of white racism has continued to inform Brazile's view of Obama's critics ever since. In 2013, for instance, Brazile said that “
two 'scandals'the IRS tax-exempt inquiries and the Department of Justice's tapping of reporters' phoneshave become lynch parties.” “And the congressional investigation of Benghazi may become a scandal in itself,” she added, calling for “an end to partisan sideshows or media witch hunts.”

In a June 2014 appearance on CNN, Brazile took issue with Republicans who had criticized President Obama's recent decision to trade five captive Islamic terrorist leaders in exchange for former American soldier Robert Bergdahl, who five years earlier, while professing contempt for his own “disgusting” homeland, had deserted the Army and ended up in the custody of the Taliban. “That’s all they do,” said Brazile. “... all they do is focus their vitriol, their rage, against this president. If the president this morning had scrambled eggs and bacon, they’d say that’s an unhealthy breakfast. If the president had cereal and fruit, they’d say that’s an unhealthy breakfast.”

In July 2014 Brazile claimed that
many Americans reflexively “want to destroy [Obama's] presidency” because of their intransigent “vitriol”rooted in that old-school way of thinking about race and opportunity” that was so prevalent in “the past of this country.”

Brazile is the founder and managing director of Brazile & Associates, a firm that assists corporate clients with “diversity training, earned media strategies, crisis management, and message development.” She also serves as a regular political contributor on CNN television, v
ice chair of voter registration and participation at the Democratic National Committee, and a contributing writer for United Media and Ms. magazine.

At various times in her professional career, Brazile has been a lecturer at the University of Maryland, a fellow at Harvard University's Institute of Politics, and an adjunct professor of Women and Gender Studies at Georgetown University. She has been a columnist for
Roll Call and a contributor to NPR's Political Corner and ABC News. And in 2004 she published the memoir, Cooking with Grease: Stirring the Pots in American Politics.

Oprah Winfrey's magazine named Brazile to its first “O Power List”; Washingtonian ranked her as one of America's “100 Most Powerful Women”; and Essence placed her among the “Top 50 Women in America.” The Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, for its part, once presented Brazile with its highest award for political achievement.

For additional information on Donna Brazile, click here.


NOTE:

[1] Brazile was Jackson's deputy campaign manager in 1984, and also the director of Jackson’s Rainbow Coalition.