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Islam

Following is an overview of the basic tenets of Islam -- not Islamic "fundamentalism," "extremism," "fanaticism," "Islamo-fascism," or "Islamism," but Islam proper, Islam in its orthodox form as it has been understood and practiced by right-believing Muslims from the time of Muhammad to the present.

(A) The Five Pillars of Islam

The five pillars of Islam constitute the most basic tenets of the religion. They are:

1. Faith (iman) in the oneness of Allah and the finality of the prophethood of Muhammad -- indicated by the declaration [the Shahadah] that, "There is no God but Allah and Muhammad is the messenger of Allah."

2. Keeping of the five scheduled daily prayers (salah)

3. Almsgiving (zakat)

4. Fasting (sawm)

5. Pilgrimage (hajj) to Mecca for those who are able

The second through fifth pillars -- prayer, almsgiving, fasting, pilgrimage -- are aspects shared by many religions. The finality of the prophethood of Muhammad, however, is unique to Islam. To understand Islam and what it means to be a Muslim, we must come to understand Muhammad as well as the revelations given through him by Allah, which make up the Quran.

(B) The Quran -- the Book of Allah

According to Islamic teaching, the Quran was transmitted as a series of revelations from Allah through the Archangel Gabriel to the Prophet Muhammad, who then dictated it to his followers. Muhammad's companions memorized fragments of the Quran and transcribed them on whatever material was at hand; these were later compiled into book form under the rule of the third Caliph, Uthman, some years after Muhammad's death.

The Quran is about as long as the Christian New Testament. It comprises 114 suras (not to be confused with the Sira, which refers to the life of the Prophet) of varying lengths, which may be considered chapters. According to Islamic doctrine, it was around 610 AD in a cave near the city of Mecca (now in southwest Saudi Arabia) that Muhammad received the first revelation from Allah. The revelation merely commanded him to "recite" or "read" (Sura 96); the words he was instructed to utter were not his own but Allah's. Over the next twelve or so years in Mecca, Muhammad received other revelations that constituted a message to the inhabitants of the city, exhorting them to forsake their pagan ways and turn in worship to the one Allah.

While in Mecca, though he condemned paganism (for the most part), Muhammad showed great respect for the monotheism of the Christian and Jewish inhabitants. Indeed, the Allah of the Quran claimed to be the same God worshipped by Jews and Christians, who now revealed himself to the Arab people through his chosen messenger, Muhammad. It is the Quranic revelations that came later in Muhammad's career, after he and the first Muslims left Mecca for the city of Medina, that transformed Islam from a relatively benign form of monotheism into an expansionary, military-political ideology that persists to this day.

A critically important principle of Quranic interpretation is known as "abrogation" (al-naskh wa al-mansukh). This principle holds that verses revealed later in Muhammad's career "abrogate" -- i.e., cancel and replace -- earlier ones whose instructions they may contradict. Thus, passages revealed later in Muhammad's career, in Medina, overrule passages revealed earlier, in Mecca. The Quran itself lays out the principle of abrogation:

2:106. Whatever a Verse (revelation) do We [Allah] abrogate or cause to be forgotten, We bring a better one or similar to it. Know you not that Allah is able to do all things?

Though the Quran was revealed to Muhammad sequentially over some twenty years' time, it was not compiled in chronological order. When it was finally collated into book form under Caliph Uthman, the suras were ordered from longest to shortest with no connection whatever to the order in which they were revealed or to their thematic content. The Meccan suras, revealed at a time when the Muslims were vulnerable, are generally benign; the later Medinan suras, revealed after Muhammad had made himself the head of an army, are more bellicose.

Consider, for example, Sura 109, which was revealed in Mecca:

109:2. "I worship not that which you worship,
109:3. "Nor will you worship that which I worship.
109:4. "And I shall not worship that which you are worshipping.
109:5. "Nor will you worship that which I worship.
109:6. "To you be your religion, and to me my religion (Islamic Monotheism)."

In contrast, consider 9:5, commonly referred to as the "Verse of the Sword," revealed in Media, toward the end of Muhammad's life:

9:5. Then when the Sacred Months ... have passed, then kill the Mushrikun [unbelievers] wherever you find them, and capture them and besiege them, and prepare for them each and every ambush. But if they repent and perform As-Salat [the Islamic ritual prayers] and give Zakat [alms], then leave their way free.

Having been revealed later in Muhammad's life than Sura 109, the Verse of the Sword abrogates the peaceful injunctions of the former. Sura 8, also revealed long after Sura 109, reveals a similar theme:

8:39. And fight them until there is no more Fitnah [disbelief and polytheism: i.e. worshipping others besides Allah] and the religion [worship] will all be for Allah Alone [in the whole of the world].

8:67. It is not for a Prophet that he should have prisoners of war [and free them with ransom] until he had made a great slaughter [among his enemies) in the land.

The Quran's commandments to Muslims to wage war in the name of Allah against non-Muslims are unmistakable. They are, furthermore, absolutely authoritative as they were revealed late in the Prophet's career and so cancel and replace earlier instructions to act peaceably. The principle of abrogation casts a shadow over Islam's claim to be a "religion of peace."

(C) The Sunnah -- the "Way" of the Prophet Muhammad

In Islam, Muhammad is considered al-insan al-kamil (the "ideal man"). He is not considered divine, nor is he worshipped (no image of Muhammad is permitted lest it encourage idolatry), but he is the model par excellence for all Muslims in how they should conduct themselves. It is through Muhammad's personal teachings and actions -- which make up the "way of the Prophet," the Sunnah -- that Muslims discern what is a good and holy life. Details about the Prophet -- how he lived, what he did, his non-Quranic utterances, his personal habits -- are indispensable knowledge for any faithful Muslim.

Knowledge of the Sunnah comes primarily from the hadiths ("reports") about Muhammad's life, which were passed down orally until codified in the eighth century AD, some hundred years after Muhammad's death. The hadiths comprise the most important body of Islamic texts after the Quran; they are basically a collection of anecdotes about Muhammad's life believed to have originated with those who knew him personally. There are many thousands of hadiths, some running to multiple pages, some barely a few lines in length. When the hadiths were first compiled in the eighth century AD, it became obvious that many were inauthentic. The early Muslim scholars labored to determine which hadiths were authoritative and which were suspect. The most reliable and authoritative collection of hadiths was compiled by Sahih Al-Bukhari, and is recognized as authentic by all schools of Islamic scholarship.

Because Muhammad is himself the measuring stick of morality, his actions are not judged according to an independent moral standard but rather establish what the standard for Muslims properly is -- regardless of whether those actions may offend the sensibilities of modern-day non-Muslims. Some examples include: 

Volume 7, Book 62, Number 88: The Prophet wrote the [marriage contract] with Aisha while she was six years old and consummated his marriage with her while she was nine years old and she remained with him for nine years [i.e. till his death].

Volume 8, Book 82, Number 795: The Prophet cut off the hands and feet of the men belonging to the tribe of Uraina and did not cauterise [their bleeding limbs] till they died.

Volume 2, Book 23, Number 413: The Jews [of Medina] brought to the Prophet a man and a woman from amongst them who have committed illegal sexual intercourse [adultery]. He ordered both of them to be stoned [to death], near the place of offering the funeral prayers beside the mosque.

Volume 1, Book 2, Number 25: Allah's Apostle was asked, "What is the best deed?" He replied, "To believe in Allah and His Apostle [Muhammad]. The questioner then asked, "What is the next [in goodness]?" He replied, "To participate in Jihad [religious fighting] in Allah's Cause."

In Islam, there is no "natural" sense of morality or justice that transcends the specific examples and injunctions outlined in the Quran and the Sunnah. Because Muhammad is considered Allah's final prophet and the Quran the eternal, unalterable words of Allah himself, there is also no evolving morality that permits the modification or integration of Islamic morality with that from other sources. The entire Islamic moral universe devolves solely from the life and teachings of Muhammad.

Along with the reliable hadiths, a further source of accepted knowledge about Muhammad comes from the Sira (life) of the Prophet, composed by one of Islam's great scholars, Muhammad bin Ishaq, in the eighth century AD.

Muhammad's prophetic career is meaningfully divided into two segments: The first was in Mecca, where he labored for fourteen years to make converts to Islam; where he preached repentance and charity; and where he was harassed and rejected by those around him. The second phase began in 622, when the Prophet was more than fifty years old. He and his followers made the Hijra (emigration or flight) from Mecca to the oasis of Yathrib -- later renamed Medina -- some 200 miles to the north. He would spend the final ten years of his life in this region, where he became an able commander and strategist who systematically conquered and killed those who opposed him.

Shortly before Muhammad fled the hostility of Mecca, a new batch of Muslim converts pledged their loyalty to him on a hill outside Mecca called Aqaba. The Sira conveys the significance of this event:

Sira, p208: When God gave permission to his Apostle to fight, the second [oath of allegiance at] Aqaba contained conditions involving war which were not in the first act of fealty. Now they [Muhammad's followers] bound themselves to war against all and sundry for God and his Apostle, while he promised them for faithful service thus the reward of paradise.

The scholarly Ishaq, the author of this passage, clearly intends to impress on his Muslim readers that, while in its early years Islam was a relatively tolerant creed that would "endure insult and forgive the ignorant," Allah soon required Muslims "to war against all and sundry for God and his Apostle." The Islamic calendar testifies to the importance of the Hijra by setting year one from the date of its occurrence. The year of the Hijra, 622 AD, is considered more significant than the year of Muhammad's birth or death or that of the first Quranic revelation, because Islam is first and foremost a political-military enterprise. It was only when Muhammad left Mecca with his paramilitary band that Islam achieved its proper political-military articulation.

(D) Sharia Law

Unlike many religions, Islam includes a mandatory and highly specific legal and political plan for society called Sharia, which translates approximately as "way" or "path." The precepts of Sharia are derived from the commandments of the Quran and the Sunnah (the teachings and precedents of Muhammad as found in the reliable hadiths and the Sira). Together, the Quran and the Sunnah establish the dictates of Sharia, which is the blueprint for the good Islamic society. Because Sharia originates with the Quran and the Sunnah, it is not optional. Sharia is the legal code ordained by Allah for all mankind. To violate Sharia or to reject its authority is to commit rebellion against Allah, which Allah's faithful are required to combat. For a more comprehensive look at Sharia, click here.

(E) Jihad

Another key component of Islam is jihad, which literally translates as "struggle." Strictly speaking, jihad does not mean "holy war" as Muslim apologists often point out. However, the question remains as to what sort of "struggle" is meant: an inner, spiritual struggle against the passions ("greater jihad"), or an outward, physical struggle taking the form of armed conflict ("lesser jihad"). According to the scholar Bat Ye'or, for non-Muslims through history jihad’s meanings have been clear: “war, dispossession, slavery and death.” For a more comprehensive look at the concept of jihad, click here.

(F) Dar al-Islam and Dar al-Harb: the House of Islam and the House of War

The violent injunctions of the Quran and the violent precedents set by Muhammad set the tone for the Islamic view of politics and of world history. Islamic scholarship divides the world into two spheres of influence, the House of Islam (dar al-Islam) and the House of War (dar al-harb). Islam means "submission," thus the House of Islam includes those nations that have submitted to Islamic rule, which is to say those nations ruled by Sharia law. The rest of the world, which has not accepted Sharia law and so is not in a state of submission, exists in a state of rebellion or war with the will of Allah. It is incumbent on dar al-Islam to make war upon dar al-harb until such time that all nations submit to the will of Allah and accept Sharia law. The only times since Muhammad when dar al-Islam was not actively at war with dar al-harb, were when the Muslim world was too weak or divided to make war effectively.

(G) Dhimmitude

After the jihad concludes in a given area with the conquest of infidel territory, the dhimma, or treaty of protection, may be granted to the conquered "People of the Book" -- historically, Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians. The dhimma provides that the life and property of the infidel are exempted from jihad for as long as the Muslim rulers permit, which has generally meant for as long as the subject non-Muslims -- the dhimmi -- prove economically useful to the Islamic state. The Quran spells out the payment of the jizya (poll- or head-tax; Sura 9:29), which is the most conspicuous means by which the Muslim overlords exploit the dhimmi. But the jizya is not merely economic in its function; it exists also to humiliate the dhimmi and impress on him the superiority of Islam. For a more comprehensive look at dhimmitude, click here.

The RESOURCES column located on the right side of this page contains links to articles, essays, books, and videos that explore such topics as:

  • the worldview and major beliefs of Islam;
  • the history of Islam, including its tradition of conquest and violence against non-believers;
  • the similarities and differences between the Sunni and Shiite branches of Islam;
  • the correlation between Islam an political repression in majority-Muslim countries;
  • why Muslim cultures lag behind others economically, socially, and technologically;
  • the history (and the persistence) of slavery in the Muslim world;
  • the speed with which Islam is growing among native-born African Americans; and
  • the implications and significance of such outward symbols of Islam as the beard, the burka, and the hijab.


(The above is adapted from "Jihad 101," by Gregory M. Davis. This item was first published in Jihad Watch.)

 
RADICAL ISLAM

While professing unwavering faith in a transcendent deity, radical Islam is a militant, politically activist ideology whose ultimate goal is to create a worldwide community, or caliphate, of Muslim believers. Determined to achieve this new world order by any means necessary, including violence and mass murder, radical Islam is characterized by its contempt for the beliefs, practices, and symbols of other religious traditions. This intolerant creed is cited by Islamists as the philosophical justification for their terrorism.

Radical Islam’s kinship with terrorism, and its willingness to use violence as a means to its ultimate ends, is clearly spelled out in a training manual produced by the radical Islamist terror group al Qaeda, whose operatives carried out the 9/11 attacks. This publication candidly says:

“[An] Islamic government would never be established except by the bomb and rifle. Islam does not coincide or make a truce with unbelief, but rather confronts it. The confrontation that Islam calls for with these godless and apostate regimes, does not know Socratic debates, Platonic ideals nor Aristotelian diplomacy. But it knows the dialogue of bullets, the ideals of assassination, bombing, and destruction, and the diplomacy of the cannon and machine-gun. The young came to prepare themselves for Jihad [holy war], commanded by the majestic Allah’s order in the holy Koran.”

Scholar of Middle East affairs Martin Kramer further describes the goals of radical Islamists:

“The idea is simple: Islam must have power in this world. It is the true religion—the religion of God—and its truth is manifest in its power. When Muslims believed, they were powerful. Their power has been lost in modern times because Islam has been abandoned by many Muslims, who have reverted to the condition that preceded God’s revelation to the Prophet Muhammad. But if Muslims now return to the original Islam, they can preserve and even restore their power. That return, to be effective, must be comprehensive; Islam provides the one and only solution to all questions in this world, from public policy to private conduct. It is not merely a religion, in the Western sense of a system of belief in God. It possesses an immutable law, revealed by God, that deals with every aspect of life, and it is an ideology, a complete system of belief about the organization of the state and the world. This law and ideology can only be implemented through the establishment of a truly Islamic state, under the sovereignty of God. The empowerment of Islam, which is God’s plan for mankind, is a sacred end.”

Both liberals and conservatives assume that the Islamist holy war against the West revolves solely around Westerners themselves, rather than having something to do with Islam itself. For example, people on the anti-war left believe that al Qaeda attacked the U.S. because the latter was imperialist, racist, or insufficiently responsive to the needs of the Third-World poor. By contrast, the pro-war right (including former President Bush) maintains that the Islamists hate Americans for their freedoms, opportunities, and overall success as a society.

A very different perspective on the Islamist mindset is offered by Mary Habeck, a military historian at Yale University. Habeck holds that radical Muslims base their war against non-Muslims on the Islamic sacred writings, particularly the Sira, which, unlike the Koran, tells the story of the Prophet Muhammed's life in chronological sequence. Using Muhammed as their model, the jihadists think and act within paradigms provided by the stages of Muhammed’s political and military career. According to Habeck, the internal logic of Islam, and not any particular provocation, real or imagined, by some outside power, is the key to understanding why the jihadists do what they do. While specific actions by the West might further enrage jihadists, their fundamental strategic and military decisions are not determined by anything done by the United States, Europe, or any other perceived enemy of Islam, but rather by tenets of itself that call for the killing of infidels.

Radical Islamists tend to gravitate toward three major methods of achieving their ultimate objective. The first is to fight the Near Enemy prior to fighting the Far Enemy. The Near Enemy is anyone inside Islamic lands, whether it is an occupier or someone who has taken away territory that used to be Islamic. The second method is to fight the Greater Unbelief—the major enemy, which today is the United States—before the Lesser Unbelief. And the third method is to fight the Apostates (false Muslims) first, and then the other Unbelievers.




IN DEPTH

BOOKS

* For recommended books on this topic, click here.


                                  VIDEOS

* For recommended videos on this topic, click here.


                                  SEE ALSO

* Islamists

* Islamist Groups

* Radical Islam

* Jihad

* Islamo-Fascism

* Anti-Semitism

* Terrorism 

* Middle East





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